CXC CSEC Math Topic: Statistics


CXC CSEC General Proficiency math topic:    

STATISTICS

 

These are the specific learning objectives that CXC has set for this CSEC math topic

 

CONTENT:

Classification and tabulation of data; frequency distribution or table, and their representation by pie charts, bar charts, line graphs, histograms, range, frequency ploygons, interquartile and semi-interquartile range as measures of dispersion (spread); mean, median and mode as measures of central tendency; simple, experimental and theoretical probability.
Grouped frequency, cumulative frequency, simple probability.

 

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES: The student should be able to:

 

1.

Construct a simple frequency table for a given set of data

 

2.

Given class size, determine class interval, boundaries and class limits for a given set of data;

 

3.

Construct a grouped frequency table for a given set of data;

 

4.

Draw and use pie charts, bar charts, line graphs, histograms, and frequency polygons;

 

5.

Determine the mean, median and mode for a set of data;

 

6.

Determine when it is most appropriate to use mean, median or mode as the average for a set of data;

7.

Determine the range, interquartile and semi-interquartile ranges for a set of data;

 

8.

Determine experimental and theoretical probabilities of simple events;

 

9.

Apply simple statistical methods to analyze data and make appropriate inferences;

 

10.

Use investigations to make inferences and generalizations utilizing the concepts listed above.

 

11.

Use the mid-point of the class interval to estimate the mean of data presented in grouped frequency tables;

 

12.

Construct a cumulative frequency table for a given set of data;

 

13.

Determine from the cumulative frequency table, the proportion and/or percentage of the sample above or below a given value;

 

14.

Draw and use a cumulative frequency curve (Ogive);

 

15.

Estimate the median of a grouped set of data;

 

16.

Analyze statistical data, commenting on the averages, the spread and the shape of the frequency distribution;

 

17.

Use theoretical probability in chance experiments, with equally likely outcomes, to predict the expected value of a given set of outcomes.

 

 

 
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